Running time 2h | Directed by Joe Talbot | USA | Drama

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Week 3

Friday, July 12
7:00 | 9:15 p.m.

Saturday, July 13
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:15

Sunday, July 14
4:30 | 7:00

Monday, July 15
7:00 | 9:15

Tuesday, July 16
7:00 | 9:15

Wednesday, July 17
7:00 | 9:15

Thursday, July 18
7:00 | 9:15

Week 2

Friday, July 05
7:00 | 9:15 p.m.

Saturday, July 06
7:00 | 9:15

Sunday, July 07
4:30 | 7:00

Monday, July 08
7:00 | 9:15

Tuesday, July 09
7:00 | 9:15

Wednesday, July 10
7:00 | 9:15

Thursday, July 11
7:00 | 9:15

Week 1

Friday, June 28
6:45 | 9:00 p.m.

Saturday, June 29
6:45 | 9:00

Sunday, June 30
7:30

Monday, July 01
6:45 | 9:00

Tuesday, July 02
6:45 | 9:00

Wednesday, July 03
6:45 | 9:00

Thursday, July 04
6:45 | 9:00

Rated R

Jimmie Fails dreams of reclaiming the Victorian home his grandfather built in the heart of San Francisco. Joined on his quest by his best friend Mont, Jimmie searches for belonging in a rapidly changing city that seems to have left them behind. As he struggles to reconnect with his family and reconstruct the community he longs for, his hopes blind him to the reality of his situation.

A wistful odyssey populated by skaters, squatters, street preachers, playwrights, and other locals on the margins, The Last Black Man in San Francisco is a poignant and sweeping story of hometowns and how they’re made—and kept alive—by the people who love them. Joe Talbot’s directorial debut is a deep and resonant meditation on the stories we tell ourselves to find our place in the world. (c) A24

The Last Black Man in San Francisco is poignant filmmaking with an invigorating spirit.
Adam Graham | Detroit News | Grade A- Full review

This is a gorgeously shot film, alternating between images of San Francisco at its most beautiful and promising, and visuals of the lost and the homeless and the forgotten, who might as well be invisible to the techies…
Richard Roeper | Chicago Sun-Times | Full review

Even when Talbot and Fails risk unraveling the film’s most cherished verities, they do so with the mesmerizing grace of a skateboard gliding down Lombard Street.
Ann Hornaday | Washington Post | Full review