Get Out

1h43m | Directed by Jordan Peele | USA | Comedy, horror, mystery

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HELD OVER

FRI, MARCH 17
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:20

SAT, MARCH 18
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:20

SUN, MARCH 19
4:30 | 7:00

MON, MARCH 20
7:00 | 9:20

TUES, MARCH 21
7:00 | 9:20

WEDS, MARCH 22
7:00 | 9:20

THURS, MARCH 23
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:20

FRI, MARCH 24
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:15

SAT, MARCH 25
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:15

SUN, MARCH 26
4:30 | 7:00

MON, MARCH 27
4:30 | 10:00

TUES, MARCH 28
7:00 | 9:15

WEDS, MARCH 29
7:00 | 9:15

THURS, MARCH 30
4:30 | 7:00 | 9:15


FRIDAY, MAR. 10
4:30pm | 7:00pm | 9:20pm

SATURDAY, MAR. 11
4:30pm | 7:00pm | 9:20pm

SUNDAY, MAR. 12
4:30pm | 7:00pm

MONDAY, MAR. 13
4:30pm | 7:00pm | 9:20pm

TUESDAY, MAR. 14
4:30pm | 7:00pm | 9:20pm

WEDNESDAY, MAR. 15
4:30pm | 7:00pm | 9:20pm

THURS, MAR. 16
4:30pm

R

Now that Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) and his girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams), have reached the meet-the-parents milestone of dating, she invites him for a weekend getaway upstate with Missy (Catherine Keener, Captain Phillips) and Dean (Bradley Whitford, The Cabin in the Woods). At first, Chris reads the family’s overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter’s interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he could have never imagined.

Equal parts gripping thriller and provocative commentary, Get Out is written and directed by Peele (Key and Peele) and produced by Blumhouse’s Jason Blum, as well as Sean McKittrick (Donnie Darko, The Box), Peele and Edward H. Hamm Jr. (The Box, Bad Words). (c) Universal Pictures

Writer-director Jordan Peele has fashioned a smart, scathing commentary … as a base for his allegory on the horror of race in America.
Adam Graham | Detroit News | Full Review

Part of what makes “Get Out” both exciting and genuinely unsettling is how real life keeps asserting itself, scene after scene.
Manohla Dargis | New York Times | Full Review

Only grows more darkly relevant as the main story gets going, masterfully unfurling all of the real-life anxieties of Existing While Black while simultaneously mining that situation for all its twisted absurdity.
Aisha Harris | Slate | Full Review